Category Archives: Uncategorized

Scheiding der machten

Dien Francken, heeft die als staatsecretaris niet de eed gezworen op onze Belgische grondwet?

Want beweren dat zijn hypothetische aannamens boven een beslissing van het gerecht staan, gaat tegen één van de wetten van onze grondwet in. Namelijk de scheiding der machten. Iemand die in functie is, gezworen heeft op die grondwet en daar totaal tegen in gaat begaat meineed en is strafbaar.

Een staatssecretarisch die zijn eed niet kan houden en die geen respect heeft voor de Belgische grondwet kan wat mij betreft niet aanblijven. Hoe populair hij door zijn populistische zever ook is.

Doing it right, making libraries using popular build environments

Enough with the political posts!

Making libraries that are both API and libtool versioned with qmake, how do they do it?

I started a project on github that will collect what I will call “doing it right” project structures for various build environments.

With right I mean that the library will have a API version in its Library name, that the library will be libtoolized and that a pkg-config .pc file gets installed for it.

I have in mind, for example, autotools, cmake, meson, qmake and plain make. First example that I have finished is one for qmake.

Let’s get started working on a libqmake-example-3.2.so.3.2.1

We get the PREFIX, MAJOR_VERSION, MINOR_VERSION and PATCH_VERSION from a project-wide include

include(../../../qmake-example.pri)

We will use the standard lib template of qmake

TEMPLATE = lib

We need to set VERSION to a semver.org version for compile_libtool (in reality it should use what is called current, revision and age to form an API and ABI version number. In the actual example it’s explained in the comments, as this is too much for a small blog post).

VERSION = $${MAJOR_VERSION}"."$${MINOR_VERSION}"."$${PATCH_VERSION}

According section 4.3 of Autotools’ mythbusters we should have as target-name the API version in the library’s name

TARGET = qmake-example-$${MAJOR_VERSION}"."$${MINOR_VERSION}

We will write a define in config.h for access to the semver.org version as a double quoted string

QMAKE_SUBSTITUTES += config.h.in

Our example happens to use QDebug, so we need QtCore here

QT = core

This is of course optional

CONFIG += c++14

We will be using libtool style libraries

CONFIG += compile_libtool
CONFIG += create_libtool

These will create a pkg-config .pc file for us

CONFIG += create_pc create_prl no_install_prl

Project sources

SOURCES = qmake-example.cpp

Project’s public and private headers

HEADERS = qmake-example.h

We will install the headers in a API specific include path

headers.path = $${PREFIX}/include/qmake-example-$${MAJOR_VERSION}"."$${MINOR_VERSION}

Here put only the publicly installed headers

headers.files = $${HEADERS}

Here we will install the library to

target.path = $${PREFIX}/lib

This is the configuration for generating the pkg-config file

QMAKE_PKGCONFIG_NAME = $${TARGET}
QMAKE_PKGCONFIG_DESCRIPTION = An example that illustrates how to do it right with qmake
# This is our libdir
QMAKE_PKGCONFIG_LIBDIR = $$target.path
# This is where our API specific headers are
QMAKE_PKGCONFIG_INCDIR = $$headers.path
QMAKE_PKGCONFIG_DESTDIR = pkgconfig
QMAKE_PKGCONFIG_PREFIX = $${PREFIX}
QMAKE_PKGCONFIG_VERSION = $$VERSION
# These are dependencies that our library needs
QMAKE_PKGCONFIG_REQUIRES = Qt5Core

Installation targets (the pkg-config seems to install automatically)

INSTALLS += headers target

This will be the result after make-install

├── include
│   └── qmake-example-3.2
│       └── qmake-example.h
└── lib
    ├── libqmake-example-3.2.so -> libqmake-example-3.2.so.3.2.1
    ├── libqmake-example-3.2.so.3 -> libqmake-example-3.2.so.3.2.1
    ├── libqmake-example-3.2.so.3.2 -> libqmake-example-3.2.so.3.2.1
    ├── libqmake-example-3.2.so.3.2.1
    ├── libqmake-example-3.la
    └── pkgconfig
        └── qmake-example-3.pc

ps. Dear friends working at their own customers: when I visit your customer, I no longer want to see that you produced completely stupid wrong qmake based projects for them. Libtoolize it all, get an API version in your Library’s so-name and do distribute a pkg-config .pc file. That’s the very least to pass your exam. Also read this document (and stop pretending that you don’t need to know this when at the same time you charge them real money pretending that you know something about modern UNIX software development).

The upcoming NATO top

I said it before, we shouldn’t finance the US’s war-industry any longer. It’s not a reliable partner.

I’m sticking to my guns on this one,

Let’s build ourselves a European army, utilizing European technology. Build, engineered and manufactured by Europeans.

We engineers are ready. Let us do it.

To be able to think, you have to risk being offensive

I mean, look at the conversation we’re having right now. You’re certainly willing to risk offending me in the pursuit of truth. Why should you have the right to do that? It’s been rather uncomfortable.

– Jordan Peterson, 2018

Verkoop met verlies

Vandaag wil ik de aandacht op een Belgische wet over het verkopen met verlies. Ons land verbiedt, bij wet, elke handelaar een goed met verlies te verkopen. Dat is de regel, in ons België.

Die regel heeft (terecht) uitzonderingen. De definitie van de uitzondering wil zeggen dat ze niet de regel zijn: de verkoop met verlies is in België slechts per uitzondering toegestaan:

  • naar aanleiding van soldenverkoop of uitverkoop;
  • met als doel de goederen die vatbaar zijn voor snel bederf van de hand te doen als hun bewaring niet meer kan worden verzekerd;
  • ten gevolge externe omstandigheden;
  • goederen die technisch voorbijgestreefd zijn of beschadigd zijn;
  • de noodzakelijkheid van concurrentie.

Ik vermoed dat onze wet bestaat om oneerlijke concurrentie te bestrijden. Een handelaar kan dus niet een bepaald product (bv. een game console) tegen verlies verkopen om zo marktdominantie te verkrijgen voor een ander product uit zijn gamma (bv. games), bv. met als doel concurrenten uit de markt te weren.

Volgens mij is het daarom zo dat, moest een game console -producent met verlies een console verkopen, dit illegaal is in België.

Laten we aannemen dat game console producenten, die actief zijn in (de verkoop in) België, de Belgische wet volgen. Dan volgt dat ze hun game consoles niet tegen verlies verkopen. Ze maken dus winst. Moesten ze dat niet doen dan moeten ze voldoen aan uitzonderlijke voorwaarden, in de (eerder vermelde) Belgische wet, die hen toelaat wel verlies te maken. In alle andere gevallen zouden ze in de ontwettigheid verkeren. Dat is de Belgische wet.

Dat maakt dat de aanschaf van zo’n game console, als Belgisch consument, betekent dat de producent -en verkoper een zekere winst hebben gemaakt door mijn aankoop. Er is dus geen sprake van verlies. Tenzij de producent -of verkoper in België betrokken is bij onwettige zaken.

Laten we aannemen dat we op zo’n console, na aanschaf, een andere software willen draaien. Dan kan de producent/verkoper dus niet beweren dat zijn winst gemaakt wordt door zaken die naderhand verkocht zouden worden (a.d.h.v. bv. originele software).

Hun winst is met andere woorden al gemaakt. Op de game console zelf. Indien niet, dan zou de producent of verkoper in onwettigheid verkeren (in België). Daarvan nemen we aan dat dit zo niet verlopen is. Want anders zou men het goed niet mogen verkopen. Het goed is wel verkocht. Volgens Belgische wetgeving (toch?).

Indien niet, dan is de producent -en of verkoper verantwoordelijk. In geen geval de consument.

This one should probably go down in history

From	Tom Lendacky 
Subject	[PATCH] x86/cpu, x86/pti: Do not enable PTI on AMD processors
Date	Tue, 26 Dec 2017 23:43:54 -0600

AMD processors are not subject to the types of attacks that the kernel
page table isolation feature protects against.  The AMD microarchitecture
does not allow memory references, including speculative references, that
access higher privileged data when running in a lesser privileged mode
when that access would result in a page fault.

Disable page table isolation by default on AMD processors by not setting
the X86_BUG_CPU_INSECURE feature, which controls whether X86_FEATURE_PTI
is set.

Signed-off-by: Tom Lendacky 
---
 arch/x86/kernel/cpu/common.c |    4 ++--
 1 file changed, 2 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)

diff --git a/arch/x86/kernel/cpu/common.c b/arch/x86/kernel/cpu/common.c
index c47de4e..7d9e3b0 100644
--- a/arch/x86/kernel/cpu/common.c
+++ b/arch/x86/kernel/cpu/common.c
@@ -923,8 +923,8 @@ static void __init early_identify_cpu(struct cpuinfo_x86 *c)
 
 	setup_force_cpu_cap(X86_FEATURE_ALWAYS);
 
-	/* Assume for now that ALL x86 CPUs are insecure */
-	setup_force_cpu_bug(X86_BUG_CPU_INSECURE);
+	if (c->x86_vendor != X86_VENDOR_AMD)
+		setup_force_cpu_bug(X86_BUG_CPU_INSECURE);
 
 	fpu__init_system(c);

Have confidence in yourself – technology will never replace human beings

Children aren’t worried about the future. Young people aren’t worried about the future; they’re worried about us: us leading them into the future we envision

Jack Ma — Oct 2017, keynote speech at Alibaba Cloud’s Computing Conference in Hangzhou

The RelayCommand in Qt

A few days ago I explained how we can do MVVM techniques like ICommand in Qt.

Today I’ll explain how to make and use a simple version of the, in the XAML MVVM world quite famous, RelayCommand. In the Microsoft Prism4 & 5 world this is DelegateCommand. Both are equivalent. I will only show a non-templated RelayCommand, so no RelayCommand<T> for now. Perhaps I’ll add a templated one to that mvvm project some other day.

What people call a delegate in C# is what C++ people call a Functor. Obviously we will use functors, then. Note that for people actually reading all those links: in C# the Action<T> and Func<T,G> are basically also C# delegates (or, functors, if you fancy C++’s names for this more).

Here is the RelayCommand.h:

#include <functional>
#include <QSharedPointer>
#include <MVVM/Commands/AbstractCommand.h>

class RelayCommand : public AbstractCommand
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    RelayCommand(std::function<void()> executeDelegatep,
                 std::function<bool()> canExecuteDelegatep,
                 QObject *parent = 0)
    : AbstractCommand(parent)
    , executeDelegate(executeDelegatep)
    , canExecuteDelegate(canExecuteDelegatep) {}

    void execute() Q_DECL_OVERRIDE;
    bool canExecute() const Q_DECL_OVERRIDE;
public slots:
    void evaluateCanExecute();
private:
    std::function<void()> executeDelegate;
    std::function<bool()> canExecuteDelegate;
};

The implementation is too simple to be true:

#include "RelayCommand.h"

bool RelayCommand::canExecute() const
{
    return canExecuteDelegate();
}

void RelayCommand::evaluateCanExecute()
{
    emit canExecuteChanged( canExecute() );
}

void RelayCommand::execute()
{
    executeDelegate();
}

Okay, so how do we use this? First we make a ViewModel. Because in this case we will define the command in C++. That probably means you want a ViewModel.

I added a CompositeCommand in the mix. For a Q_PROPERTY isn’t a CommandProxy really needed, as ownership stays in C++ (when for example you pass this as parent). For a Q_INVOKABLE you would need it to wrap the QSharedPointer<AbstractCommand>.

Note. I already hear you think: wait a minute, you are not passing this to the QObject’s constructor, it’s not a QScopedPointer and you have a new but no delete. That’s because CommandProxy converts the ownership rules to QQmlEngine::setObjectOwnership (this, QQmlEngine::JavaScriptOwnership) for itself. I don’t necessarily recommend its usage here (for it’s not immediately clear), but at the same time this is just a demo. You can try printing a warning in the destructor and you’ll see that the QML garbage collector takes care of it.

#include <QObject>
#include <QScopedPointer>

#include <MVVM/Commands/CommandProxy.h>
#include <MVVM/Commands/CompositeCommand.h>
#include <MVVM/Commands/RelayCommand.h>
#include <MVVM/Models/CommandListModel.h>

class ViewModel: public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT

    Q_PROPERTY(CommandProxy* helloCommand READ helloCommand CONSTANT)
public:
    ViewModel(QObject *parent=0):QObject(parent),
        helloCmd(new CompositeCommand()){

        QSharedPointer<CompositeCommand> cCmd = helloCmd.dynamicCast<CompositeCommand>();
        cCmd->add( new RelayCommand ([=] { qWarning() << "Hello1 from C++ RelayCommand"; },
                            [=]{ return true; }));
        cCmd->add( new RelayCommand ([=] { qWarning() << "Hello2 from C++ RelayCommand"; },
                            [=]{ return true; }));
        proxyCmd = new CommandProxy (helloCmd);
    }
    CommandProxy* helloCommand() {
        return proxyCmd;
    }
private:
    QSharedPointer<AbstractCommand> helloCmd;
    CommandProxy *proxyCmd;
};

Let’s also make a very simple View.qml that uses the ViewModel

import QtQuick 2.3
import QtQuick.Window 2.0
import QtQuick.Controls 1.2

import Example 1.0

Item {
    property ViewModel viewModel: ViewModel {}

    Button {
        enabled: viewModel.helloCommand.canExecute
        onClicked: viewModel.helloCommand.execute()
    }
}

How do they do it? Asynchronous undo and redo editors

Imagine we want an editor that has undo and redo capability. But the operations on the editor are all asynchronous. This implies that also undo and redo are asynchronous operations.

We want all this to be available in QML, we want to use QFuture for the asynchronous stuff and we want to use QUndoCommand for the undo and redo capability.

But how do they do it?

First of all we will make a status object, to put the status of the asynchronous operations in (asyncundoable.h).

class AbstractAsyncStatus: public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT

    Q_PROPERTY(bool success READ success CONSTANT)
    Q_PROPERTY(int extra READ extra CONSTANT)
public:
    AbstractAsyncStatus(QObject *parent):QObject (parent) {}
    virtual bool success() = 0;
    virtual int extra() = 0;
};

We will be passing it around as a QSharedPointer, so that lifetime management becomes easy. But typing that out is going to give us long APIs. So let’s make a typedef for that (asyncundoable.h).

typedef QSharedPointer<AbstractAsyncStatus> AsyncStatusPointer;

Now let’s make ourselves an undo command that allows us to wait for asynchronous undo and asynchronous redo. We’re combining QUndoCommand and QFutureInterface here (asyncundoable.h).

class AbstractAsyncUndoable: public QUndoCommand
{
public:
    AbstractAsyncUndoable( QUndoCommand *parent = nullptr )
        : QUndoCommand ( parent )
        , m_undoFuture ( new QFutureInterface<AsyncStatusPointer>() )
        , m_redoFuture ( new QFutureInterface<AsyncStatusPointer>() ) {}
    QFuture<AsyncStatusPointer> undoFuture()
        { return m_undoFuture->future(); }
    QFuture<AsyncStatusPointer> redoFuture()
        { return m_redoFuture->future(); }

protected:
    QScopedPointer<QFutureInterface<AsyncStatusPointer> > m_undoFuture;
    QScopedPointer<QFutureInterface<AsyncStatusPointer> > m_redoFuture;

};

Okay, let’s implement these with an example operation. First the concrete status object (asyncexample1command.h).

class AsyncExample1Status: public AbstractAsyncStatus
{
    Q_OBJECT
    Q_PROPERTY(bool example1 READ example1 CONSTANT)
public:
    AsyncExample1Status ( bool success, int extra, bool example1,
                          QObject *parent = nullptr )
        : AbstractAsyncStatus(parent)
        , m_example1 ( example1 )
        , m_success ( success )
        , m_extra ( extra ) {}
    bool example1() { return m_example1; }
    bool success() Q_DECL_OVERRIDE { return m_success; }
    int extra() Q_DECL_OVERRIDE { return m_extra; }
private:
    bool m_example1 = false;
    bool m_success = false;
    int m_extra = -1;
};

Let’s make a QUndoCommand that uses a timer to simulate asynchronous behavior. We could also use QtConcurrent’s run function to use a QThreadPool and QRunnable instances that also implement QFutureInterface, of course. Seasoned Qt developers know what I mean. For the sake of example, I wanted to illustrate that QFuture can also be used for asynchronous things that aren’t threads. We’ll use the lambda because QUndoCommand isn’t a QObject, so no easy slots. That’s the only reason (asyncexample1command.h).

class AsyncExample1Command: public AbstractAsyncUndoable
{
public:
    AsyncExample1Command(bool example1, QUndoCommand *parent = nullptr)
        : AbstractAsyncUndoable ( parent ), m_example1(example1) {}
    void undo() Q_DECL_OVERRIDE {
        m_undoFuture->reportStarted();
        QTimer *timer = new QTimer();
        timer->setSingleShot(true);
        QObject::connect(timer, &QTimer::timeout, [=]() {
            QSharedPointer<AbstractAsyncStatus> result;
            result.reset(new AsyncExample1Status ( true, 1, m_example1 ));
            m_undoFuture->reportFinished(&result);
            timer->deleteLater();
        } );
        timer->start(1000);
    }
    void redo() Q_DECL_OVERRIDE {
        m_redoFuture->reportStarted();
        QTimer *timer = new QTimer();
        timer->setSingleShot(true);
        QObject::connect(timer, &QTimer::timeout, [=]() {
            QSharedPointer<AbstractAsyncStatus> result;
            result.reset(new AsyncExample1Status ( true, 2, m_example1 ));
            m_redoFuture->reportFinished(&result);
            timer->deleteLater();
        } );
        timer->start(1000);
    }
private:
    QTimer m_timer;
    bool m_example1;
};

Let’s now define something we get from the strategy design pattern; a editor behavior. Implementations provide an editor all its editing behaviors (abtracteditorbehavior.h).

class AbstractEditorBehavior : public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    AbstractEditorBehavior( QObject *parent) : QObject (parent) {}

    virtual QFuture<AsyncStatusPointer> performExample1( bool example1 ) = 0;
    virtual QFuture<AsyncStatusPointer> performUndo() = 0;
    virtual QFuture<AsyncStatusPointer> performRedo() = 0;
    virtual bool canRedo() = 0;
    virtual bool canUndo() = 0;
};

So far so good, so let’s make an implementation that has a QUndoStack and that therefor is undoable (undoableeditorbehavior.h).

class UndoableEditorBehavior: public AbstractEditorBehavior
{
public:
    UndoableEditorBehavior(QObject *parent = nullptr)
        : AbstractEditorBehavior (parent)
        , m_undoStack ( new QUndoStack ){}

    QFuture<AsyncStatusPointer> performExample1( bool example1 ) Q_DECL_OVERRIDE {
        AsyncExample1Command *command = new AsyncExample1Command ( example1 );
        m_undoStack->push(command);
        return command->redoFuture();
    }
    QFuture<AsyncStatusPointer> performUndo() {
        const AbstractAsyncUndoable *undoable =
            dynamic_cast<const AbstractAsyncUndoable *>(
                    m_undoStack->command( m_undoStack->index() - 1));
        m_undoStack->undo();
        return const_cast<AbstractAsyncUndoable*>(undoable)->undoFuture();
    }
    QFuture<AsyncStatusPointer> performRedo() {
        const AbstractAsyncUndoable *undoable =
            dynamic_cast<const AbstractAsyncUndoable *>(
                    m_undoStack->command( m_undoStack->index() ));
        m_undoStack->redo();
        return const_cast<AbstractAsyncUndoable*>(undoable)->redoFuture();
    }
    bool canRedo() Q_DECL_OVERRIDE { return m_undoStack->canRedo(); }
    bool canUndo() Q_DECL_OVERRIDE { return m_undoStack->canUndo(); }
private:
    QScopedPointer<QUndoStack> m_undoStack;
};

Now we only need an editor, right (editor.h)?

class Editor: public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT
    Q_PROPERTY(AbstractEditorBehavior* editorBehavior READ editorBehavior CONSTANT)
public:
    Editor(QObject *parent=nullptr) : QObject(parent)
        , m_editorBehavior ( new UndoableEditorBehavior ) { }
    AbstractEditorBehavior* editorBehavior() { return m_editorBehavior.data(); }
    Q_INVOKABLE void example1Async(bool example1) {
        QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer> *watcher = new QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer>(this);
        connect(watcher, &QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer>::finished,
                this, &Editor::onExample1Finished);
        watcher->setFuture ( m_editorBehavior->performExample1(example1) );
    }
    Q_INVOKABLE void undoAsync() {
        if (m_editorBehavior->canUndo()) {
            QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer> *watcher = new QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer>(this);
            connect(watcher, &QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer>::finished,
                    this, &Editor::onUndoFinished);
            watcher->setFuture ( m_editorBehavior->performUndo() );
        }
    }
    Q_INVOKABLE void redoAsync() {
        if (m_editorBehavior->canRedo()) {
            QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer> *watcher = new QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer>(this);
            connect(watcher, &QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer>::finished,
                    this, &Editor::onRedoFinished);
            watcher->setFuture ( m_editorBehavior->performRedo() );
        }
    }
signals:
    void example1Finished( AsyncExample1Status *status );
    void undoFinished( AbstractAsyncStatus *status );
    void redoFinished( AbstractAsyncStatus *status );
private slots:
    void onExample1Finished() {
        QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer> *watcher =
                dynamic_cast<QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer>*> (sender());
        emit example1Finished( watcher->result().objectCast<AsyncExample1Status>().data() );
        watcher->deleteLater();
    }
    void onUndoFinished() {
        QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer> *watcher =
                dynamic_cast<QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer>*> (sender());
        emit undoFinished( watcher->result().objectCast<AbstractAsyncStatus>().data() );
        watcher->deleteLater();
    }
    void onRedoFinished() {
        QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer> *watcher =
                dynamic_cast<QFutureWatcher<AsyncStatusPointer>*> (sender());
        emit redoFinished( watcher->result().objectCast<AbstractAsyncStatus>().data() );
        watcher->deleteLater();
    }
private:
    QScopedPointer<AbstractEditorBehavior> m_editorBehavior;
};

Okay, let’s register this up to make it known in QML and make ourselves a main function (main.cpp).

#include <QtQml>
#include <QGuiApplication>
#include <QQmlApplicationEngine>
#include <editor.h>
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QGuiApplication app(argc, argv);
    QQmlApplicationEngine engine;
    qmlRegisterType<Editor>("be.codeminded.asyncundo", 1, 0, "Editor");
    engine.load(QUrl(QStringLiteral("qrc:/main.qml")));
    return app.exec();
}

Now, let’s make ourselves a simple QML UI to use this with (main.qml).

import QtQuick 2.3
import QtQuick.Window 2.2
import QtQuick.Controls 1.2
import be.codeminded.asyncundo 1.0
Window {
    visible: true
    width: 360
    height: 360
    Editor {
        id: editor
        onUndoFinished: text.text = "undo"
        onRedoFinished: text.text = "redo"
        onExample1Finished: text.text = "whoohoo " + status.example1
    }
    Text {
        id: text
        text: qsTr("Hello World")
        anchors.centerIn: parent
    }
    Action {
        shortcut: "Ctrl+z"
        onTriggered: editor.undoAsync()
    }
    Action {
        shortcut: "Ctrl+y"
        onTriggered: editor.redoAsync()
    }
    Button  {
        onClicked: editor.example1Async(99);
    }
}

You can find the sources of this complete example at github. Enjoy!

Duck typing

Imagine you have a duck. Imagine you have a wall. Now imagine you throw the duck with a lot of force against a wall. Duck typing means that the duck hitting the wall quacks like a duck would.

ps. Replace wall with API and duck with ugly stupid script written by an idiot. You can leave quacks.

Scrum is (best done) like a soccer team

As a freelancer I saw many companies, many situations and worked with many Project Managers, Product Owners, Scrum Masters and god knows what names the HR department came up with.

What is most important, in my experience, is that the people leading the team try to focus the people in the group on as few common goals as possible during one sprint. The more stories or goals the team has to finish, the more individualism and the fewer things will get done (with done being defined by your definition of done).

Differently put you should try to make your team work like how a soccer team plays. You try to make three, four or five goals per sprint. But you do this as a team.

Example: When a story isn’t finished at the end of the sprint; it’s the team’s fault. Not the fault of the one guy that worked on it. The team has to find a solution. If it’s always the same guy being lazy, that’s not the project’s or the team’s results. You or HR deals with that guy later. Doing so is outside of Scrum’s scope. It’s not for your retrospective discussion. But do sanction the team for not delivering.

Another example is not to put too much stories on the task board and yet to keep stories as small and/or well defined as possible. Too much stories or too large stories will result in every individual picking a different story (or subtask of the larger story) to be responsible for. At the end of the sprint none of these will be really finished. And the developers in the team won’t care about the other features being developed during the sprint. So they will dislike having to review other people’s features. They’ll have difficulty finding a reviewer. They won’t communicate with each other. They’ll become careless and dispassionate.

Your planning caused that. That makes you a bad team player. The coach is part of the team.

Onlife, Hoe de digitale wereld je leven bepaalt

Moraal filosofe Katleen Gabriels presenteerde gisteren haar boekOnlife, Hoe de digitale wereld je leven bepaalt’. Ik ben dus maar eens gaan kijken. Ik was onder de indruk.

Haar uiteenzetting was gebalanceerd; ze klonk geïnformeerd. Het debat met oa. Sven Gatz, Pedro De Bruyckere en Karel Verhoeven was eigenlijk ook wel cava. Ik ben dus erg benieuwd naar het boek.

Na een Spinoza-kenner hebben we dus nu ook een moraal filosofe die zich met oa. Internet of Things dingen zal gaan bezig houden. Ik vind het dus wel goed dat de filosofie van’t land zich eindelijk eens komt moeien. De consument gelooft ons, techneuten, toch niet dat al die rommel die ze gekocht hebben dikke rotzooi is. Dus misschien dat ze wat gaan luisteren naar s’lands filosofen? Ik denk het niet. Maar slechter zal de situatie er ook niet van worden, hé?

Enfin. Medeneurdjes contacteer die Katleen en vertel over wat je zoal hebt meegemaakt wat onethisch is. Wie weet verwerkt ze je verhaal in een uiteenzetting of volgend boek? Je kan dat nooit weten he. Je moest trouwens toch eens van die zolder afkomen.

De afspraak

Den NV-A vandaag in De Afspraak (onze eigen dezinformatsiya):

Het kinderrechtenverdrag versus de vrijheid van meningsuiting van de prinses van België. Dat, om de liefde voor het koningshuis van een liberaal, Herman De Croo, te pareren.

Het vrije debat, het is toch iets mooi.

Niet waar?

The Internet of crap – The Ioc. Now In Store!

Like I mentioned a few months ago, here we are again. More things equals more crap on the Internet. Not more utility. No. More crap. It’s only crap. With lower case ‘c’. The crap of the crap programmers of the crap is not worth wasting an expensive capital letter on.

Time to require CE marking for all that crap. Enough is enough.

It never ends

Allereerst, na Brussel blijf ik hier bij:

[over encryptie] Allereerst zolang er geen nood is moet men niets doen. Want ik zie niet meteen een echte noodzaak om alle mensen hun elektronica te kunnen kraken. Dat was vroeger niet nodig; vandaag zijn er niet meer of minder gevaarlijke gekken en elektronica voegt maar weinig toe aan hun wapenarsenaal. Dus is dat nu niet nodig.

Ik sta ook hier achter:

Oh, and to our security services: well done catching those guys from Molenbeek and Vorst. Good job

Niet gestresseerd geraken. Zoals alle mensen presteer je slecht wanneer je gestresseerd bent. Hold the line. Molenbeek en Vorst was trouwens prachtig werk. Goed gedaan.

We vinden die balans wel.